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About Vickie Sullivan

Vickie Sullivan is internationally recognized as the top market strategist for thought leaders, professional speakers and B2B professional service firms. Specializing in brand and message strategies in crowded markets, she has helped thousands of talented people outsmart their competition since 1987.

Written by: Vickie Sullivan  |  April 02, 2015

Which Book Are You Really Writing?

I get a lot of calls from authors who say “ta da — my book is finished. Now I need your help in marketing this thing. Show me the money!”

I cringe when folks say that and here’s why: too many authors write the wrong book for their market strategy. They forget that the book is just a spotlight — for you, an idea, the state of the world, whatever. So the key question is: what do you want to highlight?

If you want to highlight who you are and your work, then write what I call a “calling card” book. This book is all about your methodology. It gives interested buyers a low-risk way to check you out. And that’s a good thing. But don’t expect the book to compete with all those other titles out there. You are not generating visibility or prominence — just interest with folks who are considering your coaching or consulting services.

If you want to distinguish yourself in a crowded marketplace, you write what I call the “platform” book. The purpose of this book is to reach the reader where they are and introduce a way of thinking that will launch a movement. This book creates a community of like-minded folks. It also demonstrates what place you hold in your marketplace. The strategy here is to represent a bigger cause.

A great example of the latter is a new book by new author Bonnie Marcus. The Politics of Promotion not only sets the record straight, but also clearly shows the value of Bonnie’s perspective in this conversation. Yes, she will get coaching clients from this book, but also prominence that will open the door to new opportunities she doesn’t even know exist yet.

You don’t need much market strategy with the calling card book. Just write down your perspective and give it to your prospects. Again, that’s a legitimate approach. But if you want prominence and new opportunities, then introduce yourself in a more strategic way. Just like Bonnie did.

 

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About Vickie Sullivan

Vickie Sullivan is internationally recognized as the top market strategist for thought leaders, professional speakers and B2B professional service firms. Specializing in brand and message strategies in crowded markets, she has helped thousands of talented people outsmart their competition since 1987.